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Wisconsin Gazetteer ~ P ~

Wisconsin Gazetteer, Containing the names, location, and advantages, of the Counties, Cities, Towns, Villages, Post Offices, and Settlements, together with a description of the Lakes, Water Courses, Prairies, and Public Localities, in the State of Wisconsin. Alphabetically arranged.

Notice. Names and descriptions prepared too late for their proper place, will be found in the Appendix.

Abbreviations
L, Lake Pr., Prairie
P.O. Post Office P. V. Post Village
R, River T, Town
V, Village
CH., Court House, or County Seat

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y

Packwaukee, P. V, on section 20, town 15 K, of range 9 E., in Marquette county, 35 miles northwest from Dartford, and 50 miles north from Madison. It is situated on the north side of Buffalo Lake, on a direct line from Portage to Stevens' Point, 18 miles north from the former place. Being on the navigable waters of the Neenah River, it is supposed that this place will command the river trade of a large portion of good farming lands in Adams and Waushara counties. Population 300, with 75 dwellings, 3 stores, 2 hotels, 1 mill, and 8 religious denominations.

Packwauker, Town, in county of Marquette. It has 12 school districts.

Paint, Creek, a branch of Chippewa River from the southeast, in town 28 N., of range 8, in Chippewa County.

Pakweyorra, Lake, a widening of Chippewa River near its source.

Palmyra, Town, in county of Jefferson, being town 5 N., o£ range 16 E.; centrally located, 12 miles southeast from Jefferson. Population in 1850 was 997. It has 8 school districts.

Palmyra, P. V. 9 on section 22, in town of same name, 15 miles southeast from Jefferson, and 45 miles southeast from Madison. It is situated on Scupernong creek, on the M. & M. R. R. 40 miles from Milwaukee. It has a fine water power, and is surrounded by a good farming district, comprising prairies, openings, and wood land.

Palmyra, Lake, a small lake about three quarters of a mile south-east of Palmyra village, in Jefferson County.

Pardeeville, P. V., in town of Wyocena, Columbia County, on Neenah River, in section 3, town 12 N., of range 10 E.

Paris, P. V., in town of same name, Kenosha County, being in town 2 K, of range 21 E.

Paris, Town, in county of Kenosha, being town 2 N., of range 21 E.; centrally located, 10 miles northwest from Kenosha. Population in 1850 was 947. It has 9 school districts.

Paris, Town, in county of Grant, being town 2 N., range 2 W.; centrally located, 15 miles southwest from Lancaster. It has 4 school districts.

Patch, Diggings, a mining town in Grant County, being town 2 N., of range 1 W.

Patch Grove, Town, in county of Grant, being all of said county embraced in towns 5, 6, and 7 N., of range 5, 6, and 7 W.; centrally located, 20 miles northwest from Lancaster. It has 11 school districts.

Patch Grove, P. V., in town of same name, being on section 4, in town 5 N., of range 5 W., Grant County.

Pattenwell, Peak, in Adams County, on west bank of Wisconsin River, in town 18 N., of range 4.

Patridge, Lake, is about 4 miles long and 2 broad, in the town of Weyauwegan, Waupacca County, its outlet being at Wolf River.

Pau-wai-con, Lake, is a large expansion of Wolf River, a few miles above its mouth. It is about 10 miles wide from east to west, and 3 miles long.

Peckatonica, Forks, of river of same name, at Wiota.

Peckatonica, River, rises a few miles west of Mineral Point, in Iowa County, and running southeast through the counties of Lafayette and Green, empties into Rock River, at Rockton, Illinois.

Pemenee (Elbow) Falls, of the Menomonee River. At this place the water falls about 9 feet in the distance of 800 feet; the water is contracted to 50 feet in width.

Pensaukee, River, rises in town 25 N., of range 18 E., in Oconto County, and runs northeast, entering Green Bay in town 7 N., of range 21 E.

Pen Yann, P. O., in the county of Racine.

Pequot, P. V., on the Brothertown Reservation, at the mouth of a small stream on Lake Winnebago, in Calumet County, about 90 miles northeast from Madison.

Perry, Town, in county of Dane, being town 5 N., of range 6 E. It is 25 miles southeast from Madison. It is unorganized, but attached to Primrose.

Peshtigo, Shoals, on western shore of Lake Michigan, at the mouth of river of the same name.

Peshtigo, River, the largest tributary of Green Bay, between the Menomonee and Neenah. It enters the Bay about half way between the Oconto and Menomonee Rivers.

Pewaukee, Town, in county of Waukesha, being town 7 N, of range 19 E.; centrally located, 4 miles north of Waukesha. Population in 1850 was 1,093. It has 11 school districts.

Pewaukee, P. V., on section 9, in town of same name, in Waukesha County; situated at the foot of Pewaukee Lake, 6 miles northwest from Waukesha, on the Milwaukee, Watertown, and Madison plank road. Population 120, with 25 dwellings, 3 stores, 2 hotels, 1 saw mill, 1 flouring mill, tannery, & Baptist and a Congregational church.

Pewaukee, Lake, mostly in town of same name, in Waukesha County, is about 5 miles long and nearly a mile wide. It is fed mostly by springs, and discharges its waters at the east end, into the Pishtaka River, at which Pewaukee village and mills are located.

Pheasant Branch, P. O., in. east part of Middleton, Dane county, being town 7 N., of range 8 E.

Pheasant Branch, a small tributary of Fourth Lake, in Middleton, Dane County.

Pickardee, Creek, enters the Mississippi in town 8 N., Crawford County.

Pierce, Town. A new town in county of La Crosse.

Pierce, County, includes all that part of St. Croix County south of the north line of town 27, and was set off from St. Croix, March 16, 1853. It therefore is bounded on the west by St. Croix River, by which it is separated from the Territory of Minnesota. This county holds out very great inducements to immigrants, a large amount of the 500,000 acre grant, given by Congress to the State for schools, is in this county, and is sold at one dollar and twenty-five cents per acre, the settler being allowed thirty years pre-emption. The lands are about, half prairie and half timber, the prairies a black loam, producing as great a yield of wheat, oats, corn, and other grain, as any other part of the West. The timber is of an excellent quality, oak, ash, butternut, black walnut, sugar maple, &c. Steam boats pass up, during the season of navigation, near to the homes of the inhabitants. It is to be fully organized at once, and is attached to the sixth judicial circuit, and to the same representative districts as St. Croix, Polk and La Pointe.

Pierceville, P. V., in town of Sun Prairie, Dane County, on section 26, town 8 N., of range 11 E.

Pigeon, Creek, rises near Lancaster, and enters Grant River in Beetown, Grant County.

Pigeon, Creek, is a small stream rising in Sheboygan County, unites with Stony Greek in Farmington, Washington County.

Pigeon Grove, P. O. 9 in Columbia County.

Pike, River, is a small stream rising about 6 miles west of the city of Kenosha, taking a circuit of about 16 miles to the north, enters Lake Michigan at Kenosha.

Pin Hook, P. O., in Grant County.

Pine Bluff, P. O., in town of Cross Plains, Dane County, town 7 N, of range 7 E.

Pine, Creek, a small stream uniting with Skillet River, enters the Baraboo River about 3 miles west of the village of Baraboo.

Pine, Creek, enters the Kickapoo River from the west, in Crawford County.

Pine, Lake, is a small lake between Ked Cedar and Birch Lakes, in Chippewa County, on the east branch of Ked Cedar River.

Pine, Lake, a widening of Ked Cedar River, below Birch Lake on the same.

Pine, Lake, is of the Oconomowoc Group, lying in the south part of Merton, Waukesha County, immediately north of Nagawicka, and of the same size. It is surrounded by scenery, which, for beauty, is unsurpassed, while the land is excellent for agricultural purposes. Several beautiful villas have been built upon its borders.

Pine River, Town, in county of Waushara, being towns 19 and 20, of range 13 E.

Pine River, P. O., in Waushara County.

Pine, River, rises in town 20 N., of range 10 E., in Waushara County, and running east, enters the west end of Lake Pauwaicun.

Pine, River, rises in Bad Ax County, and runs southerly into the Wisconsin River, at the range line between ranges 1 and 3 E.

Pine, River, a tributary from the north of St. Croix River, La Pointe County.

Pine, River, (of the Menomonee), see Muskos River.

Pine Valley, Town, in county of La Crosse, being all of said county, between towns 16 and 23 N.

Pipe, Creek, rises near Dodgeville, Iowa County, and runs northerly, emptying into the Wisconsin River at Helena.

Pike, Creek, a small stream entering Lake Michigan, at Kenosha.

Pike, Lake, in town 27 E., of Portage County, the source of Big Plover River.

Pike, Lake, a small lake in town of Hartford, Washington County.

Pishtaka, River, see Fox River of Illinois.

Privabik, River, of Lake Superior, see Iron River.

Platte, Mounds, two conical shaped hills on either side east and west of Belmont, Lafayette County, about 12 miles southwest from Mineral Point, and 62 miles from Madison. They are three miles apart, and have a small mound half way between them.

Platte, River, rises in Wingville, Grant County, runs southerly, and empties into the Mississippi, in Grant County.

Platteville, Town, in county of Grant, being town 3 N., of range 1 W.; centrally located, 15 miles southeast from Lancaster. It has 8 school districts.

Platteville, P. V., is situated near the Rountree branch of Little Platte River, being on section 15, town 3 N., of range 1 W., 16 miles southeast from Lancaster, and 70 southwest from Madison. It is in the immediate vicinity of some excellent bodies of mineral. It was settled in 1827 by General John H. Rountree, and a post office was established in 1830. The village was incorporated in 1841, and contains an academy incorporated in 1839. Platteville has a population of about 1,200, with 3 hotels, 2 smelting furnaces, a large academical building, built of stone, several churches, and other public buildings.

Pleasant Prairie, P. V., in town of same name, Kenosha County, being town 1 N., of range 22 E.; centrally located, 7 miles southwest from Kenosha. Population in 1850 was 959. It has 9 school districts.

Pleasant Spring, Town, in county of Dane, being town 6 N., of range 11 E.; centrally located, 12 miles southeast from Madison. Population in 1860 was 732. It has 6 school districts.

Plover, Town, in county of Portage, being town 23 N., of ranges 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9.

Plover, P. V. & C. H., on section 22, town 23 N., of range 8 E., in town of same name, in Portage County, being the county seat. It is 120 miles northwest from Madison. Population 200, with 35 dwellings, 2 stores, 2 hotels, 1 grist and 1 saw mill.

Plum, Creek, a small stream in Brown County, entering Fox River from the south at Bridgeport.

Plum, Creek, rises in town 26 N., of range 15 W., in Chippewa County, runs southeast into Chippewa River.

Plum, Creek, empties into the Kickapoo River from the west, in Crawford County.

Plum, Island, a small island at the junction of Green Bay with Lake Michigan, south of Pottowottomee.

Plymouth, Town, in county of Rock, being town 2 N., of range 11 E.; centrally located, 10 miles southwest from Janesville. Population in 1850 was 51 1. It has 4 school districts.

Plymouth, P. V, in county of Sheboygan, being on section 22, in town of same name 15 N., of range 21 E.

Plymouth, Town, in county of Sheboygan, being town 15 N., of range 21 E.; centrally located, 12 miles west from Sheboygan. It has 8 school districts.

Point, Creek, in Manitowoc County, a small tributary of Lake Michigan, into which it empties about 10 miles southwest from Manitowoc.

Point Detour, in La Pointe County, opposite the Twelve Apostle Islands, between Chagwamigon Bay and Bank Pointe.

Pointe Sable, a point of land extending into Green Bay, in north-east corner of town 24 N., of range 21 E.

Polk, County. By an act of the legislature approved March 14, 1853, all that portion of St. Croix County lying north of the line between township 31 and 32, was set off into a separate county, to be called and known as the county of Polk. It is therefore bounded on the north by La Pointe, on the east by Chippewa, on the south by Chippewa and St. Croix, and on the west by the Territory of Minnesota, from which it is separated by the river St. Croix. It is mostly a lumber country, though the southern part contains a large area of excellent farming lands. The village of St. Croix Falls, the county seat, situated at the head of steamboat navigation on St. Croix River, is surrounded with excellent agricultural lands, and with the business naturally centering there of the extensive pineries above, must be a town of considerable importance. This county is to be fully organized during the present year, and will form a part of the sixth judicial circuit. The representation will continue as before the division of St. Croix.

Polk, Town, in county of Washington, being town 10 N., of range 19 E.; centrally located, 20 miles southwest from Ozaukee. Population in 1850 was 1,344. It has 9 school districts.

Portage, County, is bounded on the north by Marathon, on the east by Waupacca, on the south by Waushara and Adams, and on the west by La Crosse, and is 30 miles north and south, by 54 miles east and west. It was set off from Brown, Dec. 7, 1886, at which time it embraced about the present county of Columbia. By an act of the legislature, approved March 14, 1841, the territory forming the present counties of Adams, Portage and Marathon was annexed to Portage County, which was organized for county purposes, the judicial connection being with Dane. The county seat was established at the Wisconsin Portage, and the county was fully organized Jan. SI, 1844; as now organized, it does not contain any of its original limits. The eastern boundary of the county was extended one range February 27, 1851. Plover, a little east of the centre of the county, is the seat of justice. The Wisconsin River passes about centrally through the county from the north and with its branches afford many good water powers which are, at present, chiefly used for working up pine timber, with forests of which the country is covered. This county is connected with the third judicial circuit, and with the second senate and second congressional districts, and, with Marathon, sends one member to the assembly. The population, as organized in 1840, was 1,623; 1842, 646; 1846, 931; 1847, 1,504; 1850, 1,267. At the last date, including Marathon, there were 13 farms, 30 manufactories, and 280 dwellings. County Officers for 18*3: Judge, Enoch S. Bean; Sheriff, Aaron Drake; Clerk of Court, C. Shekels; District Attorney, Luther Hanchett; Clerk of Board of Supervisory Matthias Mitchell; Treasurer, Ames M. Dunton.

Portage City, P. V. & C. H., on section 5 and 8 of town 12 N., of range 9 E., in Columbia County. It is 40 miles north from Madison. Population 2,000; with 12 stores, 7 hotels, 1 steam saw mill, 2 harness makers, 4 wagon makers, 6 blacksmiths, 3 cabinet, 3 paint, 8 shoe, 3 tin and sheet iron, 3 butchers, millinery and 4 tailor's shops, 2 breweries, 2 livery stables, 2 jewelry stores, 2 drug stores, 1 brick yard, 1 iron foundry, 1 blind and sash factory, 1 chair factory and 1 tannery; 12 lawyers and 5 doctors; 3 district and 2 select schools; 1 church building and 2 denominations.

It is finely situated on a bluff between the Fox and Wisconsin Rivers at the point where they are connected by a ship canal. The Wisconsin is navigable to this place, and the commerce on the river is considerable and constantly increasing. Two steamers ply constantly between this place and Galena during the summer. The number of mills on the Wisconsin, and its tributaries, is about 100; the lumber from which seeks a market between this place and St. Louis. The amount of lumber sent below is almost beyond calculation. In addition to which, numerous mills are starting on the river at different points below the pinery, and logs are rafted to them. The amount of square timber rafted exceeds millions of feet annually, shingles and bolts, lath, pickets, (fee. The Wolf river pinery is beginning to pour its vast amounts of the finest lumber in the State, through the Fox River, which stream also is navigable for small steamboats. When the projected State improvement is finished, inter-communication will be established between the upper Lake country and the Gulf of Mexico, and the carrying trade will produce a large revenue to the State. The importance of Portage City, as a commercial point, is beyond doubt very great. It commands 200 miles north where the pine forests nourish a large population, and are continually pouring their products south, and will for years to come.

Portage, Lake, is a small body of water in the north part of Marathon County, tributary to the Chippewa River.

Portage Prairie, Town, in county of Columbia, being town 12 N., of range 12, 18 miles east of Portage city. Population in 1850 was 455. It has 4 school districts.

Fort Des Morts, see Death's Door.

Porter, Town, in county of Rock, being town 4 N., range 11 E.; centrally located, 12 miles northwest from Janesville. Population in 1850 was 881. It has 7 school districts.

Port Hope, Town, in county of Columbia. Population in 1850 was 603. It has 4 school districts.

Port Hope, P. V., in town of same name, on section 3 on the Neenah River, at the junction of French creek, 7½ miles north from Portage city, and 48 miles north of Madison, at the natural head of steamboat navigation on the Neenah River, and on the stage and mail route from Fort Winnebago to the Wisconsin pinery. It is beautifully located, in a good farming district. Population about 30; 5 dwellings, 1 store, 1 hotel, 1 Baptist, and an organized church of Methodists, and has a good hydraulic power unimproved.

Portland, Town, in county of Dodge, being town 9 N., of range 13 E.; centrally located, 14 miles southwest from Junea. Population in 1850 was 523. It has 6 school districts.

Port Washington, Town, in county of Washington, being town 11 N., range 22 E. See Ozaukee. Population in 1850 was 1,373. It has 5 school districts.

Port Washington, V., (Ozaukee P.O.), on section 28, in town of same name, in Ouzaukee County. It is the county seat, and is situated 80 miles northeast from Madison, on the lake shore, half way between Milwaukee and Sheboygan. Population, 2,500; with 300 dwellings, 10 stores, 5 hotels, 3 mills, 2 breweries, 1 foundry, 5 blacksmiths, 4 wagon-makers, 6 shoe-makers, and 5 tailors' shops; 2 good piers, 1 church, and 5 denominations.

Poplar, Creek, a small stream in the eastern part of Pewaukee, Waukesha County, being a tributary to the Pishtaka.

Poplar, River, a tributary of Lake Superior, in La Pointe County.

Potosi, P. V., on section 34, in town 3, of range 3 W., 12 miles south of Lancaster, and 80 miles southwest from Madison. It is at the head of a ravine about 2 miles from the Mississippi River, near the mouth of Grant River, and embraces the town, plats of Lafayette, Van Buren, and Dublin. This place was formerly known as Snake Hollows, at which improvements were commenced as early as 1836.

Potosi, Town, in county of Grant, being fractional town 2, and town 3 N., of range 3 W.; centrally located, 10 miles south from Lancaster. It has 8 school districts.

Pottawottomee, Island, in towns 33 and 34 N., of range 30 E., in Door County; contains about 35 square miles.

Potter, Lake, a small lake in the east part of East Troy, Walworth County.

Powack, Lake, a small body of water in the northern part of the town of Muskego, in Waukesha County.

Poynette, P. V., on section 34, town 11 N., of range 9 E., in Columbia County, 12 miles south from Portage city, and 21 miles north from Madison. It is situated in a rich farming district of cultivated lands, on Ockee creek, and has a good hydraulic power unimproved. It contains 150 inhabitants, 32 dwellings, 1 store, and 1 hotel.

Prairie du Chien, P. V. & C. H., is situated on section 6, town 6 N., of range 6 W., upon an elevated prairie, averaging one mile in width, and is about 8 miles in length, extending from the mouth of the Wisconsin River, northward, along the bank of the Mississippi. It has one of the best landings on the river, is very healthy; and all who have visited the place concur in the opinion that its location gives it a commanding commercial importance.

Prairie du Chien, Town, in county of Crawford, including the same. Population in 1850 was 1,407. It has 14 school districts.

Poysippi, P. O., in "Waupacca County.

Prairie du Lac, (Lake Prairie), is a large prairie in Rock County, near the foot of Lake Koskonong.

Prairie du Sac, P. V. in town of same name, Sauk County, on section 36, town 10 N., of range 6 E.

Prairie du Sac, Town, in county of Sauk, south of Baraboo. It has 5 school districts.

Prairie La Crosse, is the name given to the beautiful prairie at the mouth of La Crosse River, it was formerly an Indian trading station, and was frequented by them for the purpose of playing their favorite game of ball, from which fact the river now known as La Crosse river, derived its original name of Ball River.

Prairie La Crosse, Village, see La Crosse P. V.

Pratt's, Creek, rises in the north part of town of Oak Grove, in Dodge County, and runs southwest, emptying into the Crawfish, in the town of Shields.

Prescott, Town, (formerly Elizabeth), in county of Peirce, being all of said county, south of town 27 N. It is southeast of Willow River.

Prescott, P. V. & C. H., of the new county of Peirce. It is at the junction of the St. Croix and Mississippi, having a number of public houses, stores, warehouses, &c. It must eventually be an important depot for the St. Croix and its tributaries, as well as for Minnesota.

Prideaux Fork, Creek, a branch of Grant River from the north-west, in Beetown, Grant County.

Primrose, P. V., on section 9, in town of same name, Dane County; 22 miles southwest of Madison. It contains 250 inhabitants, 50 dwellings, 1 store, 1 Baptist, and 1 Freewill Baptist church.

Primrose, Town, in county of Dane, being town 5 N., of range 8 E.; centrally located, 18 miles southwest from Madison. It has 6 school districts.

Princeton, P. V. in Marquette County, being on section 24, town 16 N., of range 11 E.; 10 miles from Montello.

Princeton, (formerly Pleasant Valley), in Marquette County.

Prospect Hill, P. V., on section 29 of New Berlin, Waukesha County. It is 6 miles from Waukesha, and 70 miles southeast from Madison, at the junction of the Milwaukee and Janesville plank road with the Racine and Waukesha stage route. It has 40 inhabitants, 6 dwellings, 1 store, 1 tavern, and a steam grist and steam saw mill, 1 blacksmith and 1 wagon shop.

Puckaway, Lake, in Marquette County, is an expansion of the Neenah River, about 2 miles wide and 7 miles long.

Pulaski, Town, in county of Iowa, being towns 8 N., of ranges 1 and 2; centrally located, 10 miles northwest from Mineral Point. It has 3 school districts.

Pulaski, P. V., in town of same name, in northwest corner of Iowa County, on the Wisconsin River.

Pyki, River and Lake, upper tributaries of St. Croix River, in La Pointe County.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y

Source: Wisconsin Gazetteer,  By John Warren Hunt. Madison: Beriah Brown, Printer, 1853

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